Writer’s Block

I’m finding more and  more motivation to write, but less and less time to actually be productive.  How do people get this done?  Often, I don’t feel like it’s worth it to write for a half hour, if that’s all the time that I have, because I barely get into anything before time runs out.  I don’t have some complicated process, but I need a chance to refamiliarize myself with the characters and get back into the tone of the story before I move forward.

Does anyone else have this problem?   I’ve seen lots of other writers set word counts for themselves, or set a certain amount of time to glue themselves to their laptops.  But what do you do when writing isn’t your day job (but you want it to be)?

I was doing some reading on another writer’s site, one who is far more advanced in her writing career — she’s extremely successful in selling her books.  She mentioned how she didn’t quit her day job until the first book was in print, the second book was done, and she had a contract in place for her third.  Being more of a realist, and knowing how the publishing market has changed, I fully expect that I could end up self-publishing and be nowhere near a contract by the time I reach a third novel.  I just want to get my work out there.  I  don’t look at self-publishing as a negative, but I don’t want to create the expectation that my book is the next NY Times best seller when I can’t even find the time to write.

I feel like I need a plan.  Or a schedule.  Maybe I could just plan to invade an hour that I set aside for sleep, or maybe I should bring my laptop and just write through my lunch break.  I’m certainly open to some sage suggestions.

What do you do when all you want to do is write, but you have to put other things first because they pay the bills?

8 thoughts on “Writer’s Block”

  1. Hi, I just hopped over to your web page via StumbleUpon. Not somthing I would usually browse, but I enjoyed your views none the less. Thanks for creating something worthy of reading through.

  2. As Stephen King once wrote: one has to learn to close the door… It may still be for 1% of one’s awake time, but at least it’s time for writing. Of course there are may ways to close the door. When I was working full time, as you probably are, I used to make little notes. Then On Sunday mornings I’d write, for one hour, non-stop. Try the one hour trick before word count. Best wishes 🙂

  3. I do carve out time for writing each week. Granted, I don’t write fiction, but I do spend at least 3 hours (in one block) working on my writing projects onthe weekend. It helps me decompress the week before and put me in the right mindset for the week ahead. I give myself deadlines and outline where I want my writing project to e in the short term and the long term. Some goals are realistic and some are ambitious. It doesn’t always work, but it really helps me focus when I do sit down for writing time.

  4. I do carve out time for writing each
    week. Granted, I don’t write fiction, but I do spend at least 3 hours (in one block) working on my writing projects onthe weekend. It helps me decompress the week before and put me in the right mindset for the week ahead. I give myself deadlines and outline where I want my writing project to be in the short term and the long term. Some goals are realistic and some are ambitious. It doesn’t always work, but it really helps me focus when I do sit down for writing time.

    1. Thank you for the feedback! I find that even when I set short term and long term goals, since my outlines are already laid out, I have a hard time meeting them because of everything else going on. I guess I need to work on making it more of a priority, but it’s tough when everything feels like it should be given its due.

  5. Hello Simone, I feel your pain – I’m in exactly the same position. Sometimes my job just completely takes over my life and not only tires me out but completely fills up my mind. I lose track of where I am, I lose the thread, the flow and the tone. I have started carrying a notebook around with me so I can jot down some notes during the day (lunchtime particularly, I used to work through my lunchtime, now I give myself half an hour either to make notes or read what I’ve already written – surprising how many notes this can prompt for the rest of the afternoon). This means when I do get the chance to sit down and write I have something to refer to. It’s hard to just suddenly sit down and write fluidly but I think writing of any kind helps the creative juices flow so if I’m stuck I’ll write an email to my pen pal making the point of telling her where I left off in my book and it’s surprising how that helps get me started. I hope this has helped, Good Luck – I look forward to reading how you get on 🙂

    1. Thank you so much for your comment! I need to start carrying a notebook with me — you’re so right that it’s hard to just sit down and begin writing fluidly. I need somewhere to pick up from, and keeping the notebook could help me keep the tone in mind. Thanks so much, and good luck to you too!!

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